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Stories Stories Health Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall

Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall Featured Hot

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Written by melody     June 30, 2014    
 
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Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall.gif=profile pic.jpg

Girls who are told by a parent, sibling, friend, classmate or teacher that they are too fat at age 10 are more likely to be obese at age 19, a new study by UCLA psychologists shows.

The study looked at 1,213 African-American girls and 1,166 white girls living in Northern California, Cincinnati and Washington, D.C., 58 percent of whom had been told they were too fat at age 10.

Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall

All the girls had their height and weight measured at the beginning of the study and again after nine years.

Overall, the girls labeled fat were 1.66 times more likely than the other girls to be obese at 19, the researchers found.

 [Read Full Article: Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall ]

Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall.jpg
Simply being called 'fat' makes young girls more likely to become obese: Trying to be thin is like trying to be tall.jpg

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Epicentre
University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States

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Author
University of California - Los Angeles
Contributor's Comment
Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have a negative effect on health, leading to reduced life expectancy and/or increased health problems.
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Average user rating from: 1 user(s)

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I think it's been long understood by the vast majority of parents who actually care about how their children turn out, that to a very great degree children become what subconsciously they perceive that we believe they are.

That is to say that if you call your child 'stupid' more than a very small handful of times as he or she is growing up, and do not immediately apologise to them and point out that you are the one that has temporarily taken leave of your senses and require forgiveness and understanding; that as they develop the child will lack the confidence to express their own minds and will be more likely to submit themselves to the wills of others, always believing that the ideas of others are more valid than their own.

I would assert that this concept of self-image as being the result of the programming of our minds by exposure to the influence of those around us, is substantially the principal factor at play with regard to the outcomes of the subjects of this study. There are many responses to stress other than eating. It is far more likely that at any early age the subjects respect the analysis of those who call them fat and resign themselves to the fact that this is their inevitable identity.

I would absolutely reject the premise however, that trying not to be fat has any logical relationship to trying to be tall. If we empty our livers of glycogen, our blood streams of glucose, our bodies will metabolise fats and our body weight will decrease. There should be no debate in the matter.

Those who argue that this is a simplistic way of looking at the problem however, are correct. The problem relates to what we are taught about nutrition as we develop, however, not the physics of height increase or weight gain.

It makes much more economic sense (to the sellers) to teach people that eating carbohydrates is good for them and that they should avoid ingesting fats, as carbohydrate ingestion provokes rapid blood sugar increases and correspondingly rapid decreases, which produce inevitable cravings for more of the same - since the body has learned that this is a readily available option and the fastest means of obtaining energy.

Those who benefit from our society being so hyper consumerist would suffer substantial impact if children were taught to metabolise natural fats at an early age as they would have no cravings, would not need to eat every two to three hours as carb-addicts do, and would therefore be able to rely on foods prepared at home, rather than purchased on the go. Water is cheaper than juices and cool drinks. Have you ever noticed what kind of ratio deduction you enjoy if you only eat food at a restaurant and have water instead of flavoured drinks?

Anyway, to get back to point, if you don't want your children to become fat, I suggest that you should raise them to believe that they are expected to be in good physical condition, that there's no reason why they shouldn't be this way, and that carbohydrates are best consumed in the ratio that they occurred in nature prior to mechanised agricultural production - ie. with probably not more than 50-100 grams being ingested daily, per person.

This psychological conditioning and nutritional education will decimate diabetes and produce people who can work for many hours (provided they don't smoke cigarettes!) on important, complex projects without thinking about food; fueling brain power with fatty acids as opposed to glucose, and correspondingly increasing IQs all round. Great news for everyone except those who rely on our weakness, cravings and ignorance to inflate their bottom line.
Overall rating 
 
8.3
Cogency 
 
7.0
Credibility 
 
9.0
Accuracy 
 
9.0
Readability 
 
9.0
Perspicacity 
 
7.0
Objectivity 
 
8.5
Reviewed by Brutus June 30, 2014
Last updated: June 30, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

People respond to expectations

I think it's been long understood by the vast majority of parents who actually care about how their children turn out, that to a very great degree children become what subconsciously they perceive that we believe they are.

That is to say that if you call your child 'stupid' more than a very small handful of times as he or she is growing up, and do not immediately apologise to them and point out that you are the one that has temporarily taken leave of your senses and require forgiveness and understanding; that as they develop the child will lack the confidence to express their own minds and will be more likely to submit themselves to the wills of others, always believing that the ideas of others are more valid than their own.

I would assert that this concept of self-image as being the result of the programming of our minds by exposure to the influence of those around us, is substantially the principal factor at play with regard to the outcomes of the subjects of this study. There are many responses to stress other than eating. It is far more likely that at any early age the subjects respect the analysis of those who call them fat and resign themselves to the fact that this is their inevitable identity.

I would absolutely reject the premise however, that trying not to be fat has any logical relationship to trying to be tall. If we empty our livers of glycogen, our blood streams of glucose, our bodies will metabolise fats and our body weight will decrease. There should be no debate in the matter.

Those who argue that this is a simplistic way of looking at the problem however, are correct. The problem relates to what we are taught about nutrition as we develop, however, not the physics of height increase or weight gain.

It makes much more economic sense (to the sellers) to teach people that eating carbohydrates is good for them and that they should avoid ingesting fats, as carbohydrate ingestion provokes rapid blood sugar increases and correspondingly rapid decreases, which produce inevitable cravings for more of the same - since the body has learned that this is a readily available option and the fastest means of obtaining energy.

Those who benefit from our society being so hyper consumerist would suffer substantial impact if children were taught to metabolise natural fats at an early age as they would have no cravings, would not need to eat every two to three hours as carb-addicts do, and would therefore be able to rely on foods prepared at home, rather than purchased on the go. Water is cheaper than juices and cool drinks. Have you ever noticed what kind of ratio deduction you enjoy if you only eat food at a restaurant and have water instead of flavoured drinks?

Anyway, to get back to point, if you don't want your children to become fat, I suggest that you should raise them to believe that they are expected to be in good physical condition, that there's no reason why they shouldn't be this way, and that carbohydrates are best consumed in the ratio that they occurred in nature prior to mechanised agricultural production - ie. with probably not more than 50-100 grams being ingested daily, per person.

This psychological conditioning and nutritional education will decimate diabetes and produce people who can work for many hours (provided they don't smoke cigarettes!) on important, complex projects without thinking about food; fueling brain power with fatty acids as opposed to glucose, and correspondingly increasing IQs all round. Great news for everyone except those who rely on our weakness, cravings and ignorance to inflate their bottom line.

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