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Written by Aldine      July 10, 2014    
 
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The archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is preparing to drive through legislation to allow women bishops even if it is rejected by the church's governing body, the General Synod.

The Synod is poised to vote again on the vexed plan next week but senior sources have told the Guardian that should the move be blocked again, there are now options being considered to force the change on the church.

Options under consideration include an immediate dissolution of the Synod so that fresh elections could produce a sufficient majority by November, or even a move by the bishops in the House of Lords to introduce the legislation without synodical approval.

Stakes Are High

If the legislation passes the General Synod, parliament will rapidly approve it and it will become law in November. The first women bishops are likely to be appointed around Christmas, ending twenty years of wrangling that followed the ordination of women as priests.

The stakes are high. After the 2012 vote Tony Baldry MP, who is the Church's liaison officer with parliament, warned that any further failure would not be tolerated. Parliament would step in to legislate for women bishops whether the Synod wanted it or not.

Such a move would destabilise the rickety balance of the establishment: the General Synod was invented to allow the Church of England a form of self-government while ensuring that parliament maintained ultimate control of the established church. The convention is that the Synod makes laws which parliament must either reject or accept but may not amend.

Unofficial polling of the Synod's lay members suggests the measure will gain the 2/3 majority it needs by four or six votes.

A spokesman for the Archbishop said "We are concentrating on getting the vote through. It would not be helpful to speculate further."

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Location

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Lambeth Palace

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Andrew Brown
Contributor's Comment
The archbishop of Canterbury plans to force legislation through if the General Synod does not accept female bishops
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Please consider the following.

Welby was asked this question:

"The Church of England is part of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church, worshipping the one true God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. It professes the faith uniquely revealed in the Holy Scriptures and set forth in the catholic creeds, which faith the Church is called upon to proclaim afresh in each generation. Led by the Holy Spirit, it has borne witness to Christian truth in its historic formularies, the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, The Book of Common Prayer and the Ordering of Bishops, Priests and Deacons. In the declaration you are about to make, will you affirm your loyalty to this inheritance of faith as your inspiration and guidance under God in bringing the grace and truth of Christ to this generation and making Him known to those in your care?"

In response, Welby made the following legally binding affirmation, his Declaration of Assent:

"I, Justin Welby, do so affirm, and accordingly declare my belief in the faith which is revealed in the Holy Scriptures and set forth in the catholic creeds and to which the historic formularies of the Church of England bear witness; and in public prayer and administration of the sacraments, I will use only the forms of service which are authorized or allowed by Canon."

One of the authoritative articles to which the above question and response referred is as follows:

Article XX (of the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion). Of the Authority of the Church.
THE Church hath power to decree rites or ceremonies and authority in controversies of faith; and yet it is not lawful for the Church to ordain anything contrary to God's word written, neither may it so expound one place of Scripture, that it be repugnant to another. Wherefore, although the Church be a witness and a keeper of Holy Writ: yet, as it ought not to decree anything against the same, so besides the same ought it not to enforce anything to be believed for necessity of salvation.

Some of the scriptures to which this 20th article refers are as follows:

"Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Saviour, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope....
Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection.
... I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.
... All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness..."

This is an extract from a letter written by the Apostle Paul to Timothy (1 Timothy 1:1 & 2:11-12, and 2 Timothy 3:16). British readers will be aware that Paul is writing to someone whom he knew to be a close friend of the Princess of the Britons (Saint Claudia), not someone embedded in a culture where women had no prominence or authority. Readers will remember that it was Timothy after whom the Briton Timotheus was named, who was the son of Pudens, who was the husband of Claudia, who was the daughter of Caradoc (also known as Caradog / Caractacus / Arvirargus), who was the son of Bran the Blessed (who was also known as Bendigeidfran / 'High King of the Island of the Mighty' / Cunobeline / Cynfelyn / Cymbeline), who led the resistance against the Roman invasion of Britain until his capture and subsequent conversion in Rome. Caradoc also had two sons: Cyllin Marius and Linus (also known as Linus Lleyn the Martyr). Linus was the very first Bishop of Rome (although Papists allege that he was the second, after Peter).

It is interesting then that the most prolific Apostle wrote such clear instructions to someone so closely connected to the King of the Britons on how to conduct services of worship per se, that these instructions were carried under the auspices of the British royal family back to Britain while Paul was still living (note that Caradoc died in Rome in AD 60), and were implemented under Paul's delegated authority within Britain during his lifetime; and that now this Justin Welby is willing to break his oath and transgress instructions of such incontrovertible authority and historicity with apparently little or no qualm, while the people who ought to respond to such aberrant suggestions must presumably be distracted with thinking about food and sport, or something else sufficiently engrossing as to allow what appears to be about to happen to occur without resistance.

The matter is one of law and Scriptural authority, and therefore has nothing to do with any modern notions of propriety, taste, temporary political expediencies (since the Muslims will probably not endorse this if they transpire to control the Church of England), or of personal opinion or feeling. The proposed measures are illegal.

For this measure to be passed in November, the government needs legally to revoke extant laws from 1571, and the Church of England needs to renounce The Bible and 39 Articles as its necessary authority.

Brits: please write to your MP and lords to remind them of what they should never have forgotten in this regard.
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Reviewed by An Anglican July 15, 2014
Last updated: July 16, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Why There May Not be Women Bishops in the Church of England

Please consider the following.

Welby was asked this question:

"The Church of England is part of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church, worshipping the one true God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. It professes the faith uniquely revealed in the Holy Scriptures and set forth in the catholic creeds, which faith the Church is called upon to proclaim afresh in each generation. Led by the Holy Spirit, it has borne witness to Christian truth in its historic formularies, the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, The Book of Common Prayer and the Ordering of Bishops, Priests and Deacons. In the declaration you are about to make, will you affirm your loyalty to this inheritance of faith as your inspiration and guidance under God in bringing the grace and truth of Christ to this generation and making Him known to those in your care?"

In response, Welby made the following legally binding affirmation, his Declaration of Assent:

"I, Justin Welby, do so affirm, and accordingly declare my belief in the faith which is revealed in the Holy Scriptures and set forth in the catholic creeds and to which the historic formularies of the Church of England bear witness; and in public prayer and administration of the sacraments, I will use only the forms of service which are authorized or allowed by Canon."

One of the authoritative articles to which the above question and response referred is as follows:

Article XX (of the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion). Of the Authority of the Church.
THE Church hath power to decree rites or ceremonies and authority in controversies of faith; and yet it is not lawful for the Church to ordain anything contrary to God's word written, neither may it so expound one place of Scripture, that it be repugnant to another. Wherefore, although the Church be a witness and a keeper of Holy Writ: yet, as it ought not to decree anything against the same, so besides the same ought it not to enforce anything to be believed for necessity of salvation.

Some of the scriptures to which this 20th article refers are as follows:

"Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Saviour, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope....
Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection.
... I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.
... All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness..."

This is an extract from a letter written by the Apostle Paul to Timothy (1 Timothy 1:1 & 2:11-12, and 2 Timothy 3:16). British readers will be aware that Paul is writing to someone whom he knew to be a close friend of the Princess of the Britons (Saint Claudia), not someone embedded in a culture where women had no prominence or authority. Readers will remember that it was Timothy after whom the Briton Timotheus was named, who was the son of Pudens, who was the husband of Claudia, who was the daughter of Caradoc (also known as Caradog / Caractacus / Arvirargus), who was the son of Bran the Blessed (who was also known as Bendigeidfran / 'High King of the Island of the Mighty' / Cunobeline / Cynfelyn / Cymbeline), who led the resistance against the Roman invasion of Britain until his capture and subsequent conversion in Rome. Caradoc also had two sons: Cyllin Marius and Linus (also known as Linus Lleyn the Martyr). Linus was the very first Bishop of Rome (although Papists allege that he was the second, after Peter).

It is interesting then that the most prolific Apostle wrote such clear instructions to someone so closely connected to the King of the Britons on how to conduct services of worship per se, that these instructions were carried under the auspices of the British royal family back to Britain while Paul was still living (note that Caradoc died in Rome in AD 60), and were implemented under Paul's delegated authority within Britain during his lifetime; and that now this Justin Welby is willing to break his oath and transgress instructions of such incontrovertible authority and historicity with apparently little or no qualm, while the people who ought to respond to such aberrant suggestions must presumably be distracted with thinking about food and sport, or something else sufficiently engrossing as to allow what appears to be about to happen to occur without resistance.

The matter is one of law and Scriptural authority, and therefore has nothing to do with any modern notions of propriety, taste, temporary political expediencies (since the Muslims will probably not endorse this if they transpire to control the Church of England), or of personal opinion or feeling. The proposed measures are illegal.

For this measure to be passed in November, the government needs legally to revoke extant laws from 1571, and the Church of England needs to renounce The Bible and 39 Articles as its necessary authority.

Brits: please write to your MP and lords to remind them of what they should never have forgotten in this regard.

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